Wednesday, February 27, 2008

 

President Obama

A frightening thought

One of the reasons behind Obama's spectacular rise is that, as the candidate with the least experience in Washington, he can credibly articulate something many Americans see as our biggest problem:
But the biggest divide in America today is not between its people, it is between its people and their leaders in Washington, DC.
I think a healthy majority of Americans would agree with that last point. In my opinion, it is the biggest problem we face as a nation and his ability to articulate it is one of his biggest strengths.

I've always considered Obama too far to the left to possibly win in November. I'm beginning to fear that may not matter. John Hinderacker argues "Obama's appeal lies, in part, in his ability to make liberalism seem palatable." He cautions:
Ronald Reagan came to power at a time when America had been carrying out, for sixteen years, an experiment with liberalism that by 1980 had brought the country to the brink of catastrophe. Americans did not adopt conservative principles because they sounded good on first hearing. They adopted conservative principles because of bitter experience with the alternative.

Today, the benefit of that experience has largely been lost. A generation of American voters has not experienced the failures of the Great Society, the near-collapse of American cities, double-digit inflation and unemployment, seventy percent tax brackets, or the disaster of Jimmy Carter's foreign policy. In the absence of historical memory, and with a powerful assist from the ever-forgetful press, liberalism is once again emerging as the philosophy that sounds good. The fact that it doesn't work awaits as an unpleasant surprise for a new generation. In the meantime, Barack Obama may well be the plausible candidate who can lead voters, once again, down the blind alley of leftism.
I thought about that while watching this video:



Via Scott Johnson, who notes a few quotes from the video:
I will cut investments in unproven missile defense systems...

...I will not weaponize space...

...I will slow development of future combat systems...

...and I will institute a "Defense Priorities Board" to ensure the quadrennial defense review is not used to justify unnecessary spending...

...I will set a goal of a world without nuclear weapons...

...and to seek that goal, I will not develop nuclear weapons...

...I will seek a global ban on the development of fissile material...

...and I will negotiate with Russia to take our ICBMs off hair-trigger alert...

...and to achieve deep cuts in our nuclear arsenals...
I find Obama's proposal to essentially disarm America frightening. Scarier still is the fact that the Democratic Party's Intrade Presidential Election Winner contract has been holding fairly steady, trading between 64 and 68 ever since Obama became viewed by that same market as the overwhelming favorite for the Democratic nomination.

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